5 kinds of Doctors you’ll come across in a hospital

So after graduating from the Medical school I realized that it wasn’t so bad. Just kidding. It was bad. But then again I had loads of fun too. Anyways so when I looked back at my five years as a medical student I realized that both the fun part of a rotation and the misery was almost entirely dependent on the doctor I was rotating with. So based on my observation I categorized my mentors into five groups.

1. THE REALLY COOL DOC: “The name’s Bond, James Bond” .. Seriously, did you lose your way to the theater and end up in a hospital? As you watch this spic and span doctor enter with everything in place and a smile to top it all up you realize this is who you want to be. During his rounds he is empathetic and caring and knows his stuff well. Wow. Could it get any better? Best of all he gives you a chance to speak and make your point without passing any unwanted remarks or judgments. So by the end of your rotation you are all confident, you have gained some knowledge about the rotation and you are still yearning to learn more from this guy. Best time ever!

2. DOCTOR FRANKENSTEIN: “You rang?” When you first see this guy all you can think of is Lurch from The Addams family. I mean did you sleep well in the mortuary last night doctor? Or maybe say hello to the cadavers sir. This doctor looks totally shabby and is definitely sleep walking half the time in the hospital hallways. Now there is a 50/50 chance of him teaching you anything during the rotation depending upon his sleep deprivation status. But the best part is that he won’t notice your absence so all the more to be late on a round or take a tour to the cafeteria without getting into trouble. All in all, fun but not exciting.

3. Le MISERABLE DOCTOR: His wife left him, the system doesn’t care for him, the worlds coming to an end and medical students should never have graduated are the lines you keep hearing from this one. He will be least interested in teaching you any constructive stuff. All you’ll hear will be complaints and more complaints until you realize that people like him are the reason for the high suicidal rates among the doctors. This rotation passed slower than the rest and by the end of it you may have probably ordered yourself a .45 pistol on Ebay. Terrible time of the year this one.

4. THE SARCASTIC ONE: This guy will keep you on your toes 24/7. Leaving no opportunity to make you feel like crap and passing snide remarks each time you get something wrong you realize why people hate doctors so much. Now there is an 80% chance that this one will be a surgeon (not that I have anything against the surgeons. Purely my personal experience. No offence) God complex, perfectionism and constant urge to humiliate someone are some of the weapons he’ll carry around. By the end of this rotation you’ll be turning in a Le Miserable Doctor yourself and wondering whether to shoot him or yourself with that gun you purchased from Ebay.

5. THE OPPRESSED ONE: This guy will remind you of your childhood days. When there was this kid who everyone used to bully for no apparent reason. And he wouldn’t stand up for himself rather always act like he had Stockholm Syndrome. So during your rounds you’ll realize that instead of looking up to him as a mentor he is looking up to you. He is just sad. At first you get a thrill at getting the authority (Hmmm.. So this is how you end up becoming “The Sarcastic Doctor”) but then you get a feeling of guilt and try to cheer him up and act helpful during rotations. You should probably carry a pack of tissues just in case an emotional scene erupts between you two. But this rotation will teach you how to use authority and yet remain humble.

Photo credits:Hand image created by Jannoon028 – Freepik.com

23 things NOT to put on your CV – Resume writing for doctors

Is my resume ok? Is it what is expected?
We hear from many doctors who work with us as locums, or those who are wishing to work in the Australian medical system that they are not confident about their CV. They fear it is too long, too short, in the wrong format, the wrong font, doesn’t include the right information, or is not what is expected in Australia.

For the most part, their fear is well founded.
Having recruited to a number of different professions, I can say with absolute confidence that medical CVs are among the very worst I have ever seen. Somehow, amazingly, many doctor’s CVs seem to really hit every mark of ‘what not to do’. Rest assured, though, that it is certainly a problem you can fix.

Why is it so?
The short answer is ‘market forces’. Did you need to supply a CV to get an intern job? No. When you applied for your next job as an RMO/HMO, did it really matter what your CV looked like? Probably not – there were plenty of jobs.

There is a huge surplus of medical jobs in Australia, so by necessity, you haven’t had to learn the skill of writing a CV. Just a few years ago, you could most likely get a locum job with half a CV written on the back of a banana leaf.

What has changed?
Slowly, the medical employment market is becoming more competitive, and regulated. Many colleges are not increasing the amount of training places available and most employers are heavily formalising selection and employment of locums, even for short term jobs. There is now a need to really master the skill of getting your CV right.

What not to do, in a nutshell
First, forget everything you learnt at school about writing CVs. It was a waste of time. Second, never include any of these items in your CV. You may laugh at some of these, but most of them we see every single day on resumes, some are rarer – but are real examples of what I have personally seen.

1. Photograph
2. Marital status
3. Health status
4. Hobbies or interests
5. Details of children
6. Any paragraph longer than 40 words
7. Sporting achievements
8. Anything negative
9. Anything untrue
10. Your race or colour
11. Date of birth
12. Referees names and contact details (Why? Because you want to control access to your referees)
13. Religion
14. Political affiliations
15. Height or weight
16. Weird or offensive email addresses (such as hotpants69@sexylady.com)
17. Irrelevant jobs
18. Irrelevant education
19. Salary/income expectations
20. Anything spelt incorrectly
21. Irrelevant rants about your life, travel, desires, etc
22. Lists of every single procedure you have ever done, or considered doing in your life
23. Detailed background of your Medicare fraud activities

There are some exceptions to these rules – for example, when an employer or college specifically asks for certain information to be included.

Your homework

Open up your CV right now, identify anything that should not be in there, and delete it. For some of you, you may have only a blank page left!  You now have an excellent starting point to a killer CV.

10 Tips To Be A Successful Doctor

New Law Allows Med School Grads to Work as 'Assistant Physicians'

1- Read more : Every day there are new medical studies , new diseases , new drugs … etc , if you want to be a successful doctor you should read more everyday.

2- Details : Pay attention to details , you may diagnose a case with only one hidden word or sign.

3- Money is not everything : You are a physician , It is not an ordinary job you are treating with humans.

4- Ambitious : Ambition has no limit and you should renew your ambition to renew your success.

5- Humility : Respect others , even if you are excellent people hate conceited physicians , also even if you are excellent young doctors may know what you dont know.

6- Responsibility : Be responsible in every action you make as we said before it is not an ordinary job.

7- Communication skills : If you have time you can take a communication skills course , you should deliver good and bad news or advises for patients in a right manner.

8- Time management : You should manage your time between your work and your family and yourself , you are not a machine , Enjoy your life.

9- Be Patient : Dont hurry up , If you are good doctor you will be famous and you will be successful.

10- Marketing : You should search about new ways of medical marketing so people can find you.

Which is the best country to work in as a doctor?

This question was posted in Quora by Liang-Hai Sie
These are just a few thought where people say it’s difficult or good to work as a doctor.
The not so good stories are from:
-Eastern Europe: for most the pay is low, so many are unsatisfied
-Italy: most medical specialist aren’t paid so well
-UK: loss of control how to manage one’s practice is said to lead to a lot of burn-out?
-Germany: working hours are long, secondary job benefits are less than e.g. in The Netherlands
-SE Asia: in the more developed countries working hours are long, income is good, social standing good.  I think in the poorer countries all is a lot less.
-China: pay is not good, long working hours.


This is from a survey on burn-out in Chinese vs US physicians:
It is manageable and I’m not making any changes (36% vs 25%)
It is manageable but I need to make some changes in hours/workload/etc. (52.2% vs 62%)
I am thinking of leaving my current position (7.3% vs 7%)
I am thinking of leaving medicine altogether (4.5% vd 5%)

Financial position Chinese vd US physicians:

At present still OK:

-Scandinavian countries: working hours were quite OK, income relatively low, but one could have a good private life.  No problems with people unable to afford their essential medical care.
-The Netherlands: at present income and working conditions are still OK, but docs are losing more and more income and their say about how their practice are organized. Universal health care, people are mandatory insured for essential health care.
-USA??  Income if not a primary care physician is quite alright, high student loans, the threat of being sued, but all in all docs and partners are quite satisfied.

From:  Medscape: Medscape Access
Physician Lifestyles — Linking to Burnout: A Medscape Survey


As for partner satisfaction, as long you have more than two hours of face time a day, is high: 70%  See Elsevier The Medical Marriage: A National Survey of the Spouses/Partners of US Physicians (unfortunately at present only accessible to subscribers or if you pay for access)

Working Hours of Doctors According To Country

Resident duty hours around the globe: where are we now?

        • John Temple

      Background image created by Luis_molinero – Freepik.com

      BMC Medical Education201414(Suppl 1):S8

      DOI: 10.1186/1472-6920-14-S1-S8

      Published: 11 December 2014

      Abstract

      Safe and appropriate health care, especially in urgent or emergency situations, is the expectation of the public throughout the developed world. Achieving this goal requires appropriate levels of medical and other staff, appropriate training, and sensible working hours. Too often the brunt of such care, especially in out-of-hours situations, is borne by medical residents, who – to make matters worse – are frequently poorly supervised by more senior and experienced staff. Many jurisdictions have been alerted to this problem and are striving to correct it. However, the variation in attempts to restrict the actual hours worked by residents to “safe” levels is enormous, and all too often there is no consensus as to what should be put in place to achieve safe patient care. This paper sets out the current position for Europe, North America, and Australia.

      Introduction

      The volume of hours worked by medical residents has been a concern for years. The realization that tired, inexperienced, and poorly supervised doctors make more mistakes than those who are fresh, alert, and closely guided has become apparent everywhere. And yet there remains a huge variation in the implementation of controls over the actual hours worked, the environment available for learning, and the degree of real supervision afforded to these young professionals.

      Variation is seen both between countries with supposedly modern health care delivery systems and within the health systems of those countries themselves. What should be the role of medical residents? Should they be viewed as practitioners primarily, who provide service and attain further learning by clinical exposure (and, some would say, experience), or are they genuinely doctors in training, for whom every clinical event should be an appropriately supervised learning opportunity?

      The former system has resulted in a random, unstructured, arbitrary, and often patron-dependant method of acquiring the necessary skills to be competent for independent clinical practice. The latter process, which has gained more recognition if not actual implementation in recent times, still has a long way to go before it becomes the accepted and quicker route to senior levels of service and care delivery. This paper reports on some of the systems and situations around the globe concerning the statutory regulation—or lack of it—as to what constitutes good practice leading to appropriate training of young doctors and, ultimately, safer patient care.

      The case of Libby Zion, an 18-year-old woman who died while under the care of residents in a hospital emergency department in New York City in 1984, was the original stimulus to resident duty hour reform. The publicity that surrounded this case highlighted and subsequently influenced attempts to regulate the completely unrestricted hours worked by residents in hospital practice throughout the world. Subsequently, the lead in the journey of restricting hours was taken by Europe. The European Working Time Directive (EWTD), issued by the Council of Europe to protect the health and safety of all workers in the European Union, became law in 1998. It empowered a set of minimum requirements, including the following:

    • a maximum work week of 48 hours
    • a minimum rest period of 11 consecutive hours per 24-hour duty
    • a minimum rest period of 24 hours per 7-day duty, or 48 hours of rest per 14-day duty
    • a minimum of 4 weeks of paid annual leave
    • a maximum of 8 hours’ work in any 24 hours for workers in stressful positions
    • a minimum 20-minute rest period per 6 hours worked
    • The following section will review the outcome of the EWTD for medical residents since its implementation.

      Europe

      Official information remains extremely hard to gather or collate. An official European Union document reporting country-by-country compliance with the EWTD was due for publication in 2008 but has still not been released. The current situation of the 48-hour EWTD is as follows. There are beacons of achievement. Denmark has been compliant with the EWTD for many years and has a normal work week of 37 hours. Sweden and Germany indicate good compliance.

      Finland is probably compliant. The Netherlands reached compliance during 2011. Norway, which is affiliated with the European Union but is not a full member, trains young doctors in a weekly average of 45 hours. The United Kingdom reports compliance now, but recent research suggests that up to 25% of junior doctors are still working beyond the 48-hour limit. Compliance figures are not available for 11 countries, namely Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Portugal, Slovakia, and Slovenia. There is anecdotal evidence that many doctors in Spain, Ireland, Greece, and France are working more than the regulation 48-hour week, often without additional pay.

      Poor working conditions and excessive hours, but no hard data, are reported anecdotally in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and Romania. However, many of this latter group joined the European Union relatively recently and were not previously subject to the EWTD. In the United Kingdom, the full implementation of the 48-hour EWTD in August 2009 led to widespread concern about the ability of the National Health Service (NHS) to continue to deliver both high-quality training for its staff and safe clinical service. In the health care sector, the EWTD was found to affect only doctors and, more specifically, only those in the secondary care sector.

      The 2010 report Time for Training found that although “high quality training can be delivered in 48 hours” in the NHS, “this is precluded when trainees have a major role in out of hours service, are poorly supervised and access to learning is limited.” Thus, only 6 of the 27 European member states meet the prescribed standard, some 14 years after the EWTD became a legal requirement. In view of this lack of success, renegotiation of the 48-hour restriction, along with other factors, has been requested, but it will take a very long time for any revision to be agreed, let alone put into practice.

      [su_button url=”http://www.meddybear.net/working-hours-doctors-according-country/2/” size=”5″ center=”yes” icon=”icon: forward”]Next page[/su_button]

150+ Free Pages of Mnemonics in All Medical Branches!

While browsing on the web searching for mnemonics, we found a nice PDF with 100+ pages including mnemonics in “Anatomy – Biochemistry – Cardiology – Dermatology – Embryology – Emergency Medicine – ENT – Epidemiology – GIT – Genetics – Histology – Immunology – Family Medicine – Internal Medicine – Physical Exam – Microbiology – Neurology – Gynecology – Ophthalmology – Orthopedics – Pulmonology – Pediatrics – Pharmacology – Physiology – Podiatry – Psychatry – Radiology – Oncology – Rheumatology – Surgery and Nephrology”

Samples:100 Free Pages of Mnemonics in All Medical Branches! 100 Free Pages of Mnemonics in All Medical Branches! 100 Free Pages of Mnemonics in All Medical Branches! 100 Free Pages of Mnemonics in All Medical Branches!

The other list you can find it herehere and here.

Can a schizophrenic become a doctor?

17 this year, and I have interest in pursuing medicine after I clear my national exams. Say if I can manage my symptoms well with an exception of a few relapses and do well in my national exams in the next three years, would this illness in any way, hinder me from getting into a medical school?

This question was originally posted on Quora, which was answered by Susan Winslow, 25 years Certified Psychiatric Nurse 

Yes, a person with schizophrenia can become a doctor and people have. However it is challenging and I will tell you why. Simply put, inordinate amounts of stress bring on relapses. With each relapse a person with schizophrenia has they increase their liklihood of having another relapse ( it is the same with cancer) . With each relaspse a person suffers the more damage is done to the brain in the areas of higher executive functioning ( in the prefontal cortex). This is the area of the brain required to study, train and actually practice as a doctor.

As a nurse who has spent the majority of my career in a teaching medical center and have worked side be side medical students, residents, and attending physicians this is one of most stressful professions I can think of entering. It is not only stressful on your mind it is also stressful on your body , on your family life and on you emotionally. I could go on and on but since I don’t have the space to do that I would suggest through your school , you ask to shadow a doctor at a local hospital or in your local emergency room, just to see what a “ day in the life “ is like.

That will give you an idea of how busy they can be, how often they need to switch gears, deal with emergencies, give extremely sad news to family members, listen to people who don’t agree with what you have told them, get yelled at, keep up with documentation, put off going to the restroom, are expected to know everything, perform miracles and have all the time in the world for each patient, maybe get 15 minutes for lunch, have memories like steel traps, and treat every one with respect, concern and dignity and chances are you are doing this on very little sleep.

I am not trying to discourage you . This is real life as a doctor. Being a resident is even harder because you are trying to proove yourself in order to become a doctor. With the illness of schizophrenia I would think long and hard and do lots of first hand work to see if you could actually see yourself doing the job and managing the illness. Your illness requires little to no stress, at least 7–8 hrs of sleep per night, three well balanced meals per day, adequate amounts of exercise to move your bigger muscle groups, time spent at rest, a very good support network, and fun activities.

I myself can think of other careers that involve medicine that wouldn’t jeopardize your health for instance nursing, nurse practitioner, many areas of research, medical ethics, medical law, medical IT ( the fatest growing career right now) etc.

Give it some thought, so many careers but your health is your top priority ! My Best.

What do you think? Let us know in the comment bellow.

Average salaries for physicians depending on their specialty

According to the American medical group association “AMGA” report in 2006 this is a list of average salaries for physicians in USA. This list may help you if you are medical student or young doctor so you can choose the most suitable specialty for your capabilities and needs.

Orthopedic Surgery – Spine : $688,503

Orthopedic Surgery – Joint Replacement : $605,953

Neurological Surgery : $592,811

Cardiac & Thoracic Surgery : $533,084

Orthopedic Surgery : $500,672

Diagnostic Radiology – Interventional : $478,000

Orthopedic Surgery – Hand : $476,039

Transplant Surgery – Liver : $454,287

Diagnostic Radiology – Non-Interventional : $454,205

Radiation Therapy (M.D. only) : $447,250

Orthopedic Surgery – Pediatrics : $425,000

Trauma Surgery : $424,555

Pediatric Surgery : $419,783

Urology : $413,941

Vascular Surgery : $413,629

Gynecological Oncology : $413,500

Gastroenterology : $405,000

Cardiology : $402,000

Colon & Rectal Surgery : $394,723

Perinatology : $394,121

Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery : $390,142

Oral Surgery : $380,500

Dermatology : $375,176

Anesthesiology : $370,500

Otolaryngology : $368,777

Transplant Surgery – Kidney : $365,125

General Surgery : $357,091

Pathology (M.D. only) : $354,750

Nuclear Medicine (M.D. only) : $331,000

Hematology & Medical Oncology : $320,907

Reproductive Endocrinology : $317,312

Intensivist : $313,152

Pulmonary Disease : $306,829

Orthopedic-Medical : $297,348

Neonatology : $280,771

Gynecology & Obstetrics : $275,152

Obstetrics : $275,152

Pediatric Intensive Care : $272,000

Emergency Care : $267,293

Critical Care Medicine : $264,750

Hypertension & Nephrology : $259,677

Allergy & Immunology : $249,674

Pediatric Gastroenterology : $240,895

Ophthalmology : $238,200

Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation : $237,628

Neurology : $236,500

Pediatric Cardiology : $233,958

Gynecology : $232,075

Sports Medicine : $231,540

Infectious Disease : $227,750

Rheumatologic Disease : $224,000

Occupational / Environmental Medicine : $223,750

Urgent Care : $222,920

Pediatric Neurology : $219,561

Endocrinology : $218,855

Psychiatry – Child : $216,360

Hospitalist : $215,716

Psychiatry : $214,740

Internal Medicine : $214,307

Pediatric Hematology / Oncology : $212,577

Pediatrics & Adolescent : $209,873

Pediatric Infectious Disease : $209,680

Family Medicine – with Obstetrics : $209,565

Family Medicine : $208,861

Pediatric Pulmonary Disease : $201,841

Pediatric Nephrology : $198,686

Pediatric Allergy : $198,458

Pediatric Endocrinology : $187,957

Geriatrics : $187,602

Photo credit: People image created by Kues1 – Freepik.com

Why are lab coats and physician coats white colored?

The white coat gives a specific emotional response from patients.

Traditionally, they were beige, but white is synonymous with innocence, being trustworthy, cleanliness and life. In the past, doctors wore their street clothes most often or black, reflecting the mortality and frequent deaths seen in their chosen profession.

Today, the coats lend an air of professionalism and evoke feelings of a doctor’s superiority and intelligence in patients.

Recently, my sister received her white coat in a ceremony held at her medical school. Many medical schools do this as a rite of passage, symbolizing beginning a physician’s role. Some hospitals use the white coat to differentiate between nurses and doctors.

The white coat is currently being debated. In 2009, the American Medical Association voted to stop using the white coat Because it can harbor bacteria and germs, being worn from one visit with a patient to the next.

Essentially, today, the white coat evokes a feeling of confidence in patients. It says, “I’m a healer, a scientist, a trustworthy person with lots of school and training.”

Older people especially tend to like the white coat but more doctors are moving to just their everyday clothes or scrubs and a stethoscope draped around their neck.

Posted by Michelle Roses on Quora

How Much Do Doctors Really Make?

Taking into consideration the explosive growth of human population globally, having reached a staggering 7.5 billion last year, one profession we can’t ever get enough of are medical doctors. With third world countries contributing to a major chunk of the populations, doctors are needed more than ever to counter and eradicate prevalent diseases that underdeveloped or even well developed countries find themselves up against. Did you know that doctors are among the highest paid professionals in the United States of America? Software engineers, lawyers along with other professions considered prestigious have a pay scale below that of medical doctors.
Ailments and illnesses are and have always been a part of the human condition which is why doctors can never run out of job openings. This high demand is represented by the sky high salaries that doctors receive. Doctor’s salaries vary drastically according to their specialization and area of practice. A doctor can earn about $156,000 a year as a pediatrician to about $315,000 as a radiologist or orthopedic surgeon. Interestingly so, despite these numbers, only about 11% of doctors consider themselves rich. Surveys have revealed that about 51% of all physicians and 46% of primary care physicians think that they were compensated fairly.

The “Doctors are overpaid” argument
Many would argue that doctors are overpaid. This claim is widely contested. In England, the basic salary for a newly qualified doctor is £20,295. Additional pay over this is accounted for the overtime hours. The average nurse works for 37.5 hours per week and junior doctors work around 56 hours per week but this number can increase depending on the patient influx and overtime hours. If a nurse chooses to put in extra hours, they are rewarded accordingly. It’s also important not to forget the responsibility a doctor carries with him. When things go well, the healthcare team including staff and nurses are appreciated, but when things go wrong, doctors are to be blamed. Additionally, being a doctor isn’t all about attending to patients and working long hours. It means continual studying, research and staying updated on medical advances happening internationally.

Let’s take a look at the highest paid salaries amongst doctors
Orthopedics seems to be the most financially rewarding specialization with an average salary of $421,000 for patient care in 2014. Orthopedists seem to earn a lot more than other physicians when it comes to non-patient care activities too. These may include product sales and speaking engagements which can add another $29,000 a year. Cardiologists are the runner-ups with an average compensation of $376,000 for patient care only. Whereas, non patient care activities can earn them another $19,000 on average. Developed countries have a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases and obesity is another associated culprit responsible for the rising mortality rate of developed nations. The first world lifestyle of fast food coupled with a sedentary way of life seems to keep cardiology amongst the most needed heath care. Moreover, gastroenterologists are third on the list with an average compensation of $370,000 for patient care and another $14,000 in non-healthcare activities.

Cover picture by iofotoyayimages.com

The Darker Side Of Medicine: Another Doctor Assaulted While On Duty

Being a doctor is a noble calling. All those years spent in medical school, then specialization, more studying, sleepless nights on duty, etc… Learning never really ends when you decide to commit yourself to this profession.

It takes years, even decades for a person to become a good medical professional.

But, not everyone knows how to appreciate all the efforts a doctor has to go through his/her education.

Here is the story of Dr Mohammed Ruda, from Baghdad (Iraq). Dr Ruda is a resident in general surgery at the Sheikh Zayed Hospital in Iraq. He is currenty preparing his Phd in surgery.

While he was on call, this Wednesday, a female patient was admitted to the hospital. In the Emergency Room, she presented with severe right lower abdominal pain, with a possibilty of appendicitis. Dr Ruda came to examine the patient for rebound tenderness. 

But, what came next, no one could predict…..

Instead of helping the female patient, the doctor was hit in the face by the patient’s husband, who was against the medical check-up. He did not allow Dr.Ruda to examine his wife.

The doctor ended up with bloody nose and a possible fracture. (See picture below)

According to Dr Ruda’s colleagues, attacks like this one, are almost common thing in this hospital. That’s certanly not an environement anyone would want to work in.


When we talk about security in hospitals in general, it’s always directed toward a patient. But what about doctors?Cases like these show us that doctors are not safe in their own workplace.If the patients (or their family members) are free to assault a doctor, who is going to treat them later on?

We need to stop and think for a minute, as this kind of behavior should not be tolerated.

Complete medical personnel, from nurses, technicians, paramedics to doctors needs to be treated with respect and gratitude. Those people are the ones that put their lives aside, to save somebody else.

Recognize their effort, and show them you are thankful for their care and help.

Share if you care!

Image used: http://focus.cnhubei.com/consensus/200912/t883804.shtml

Sorrow Of The Dentist by Ayam Chhatkuli

And now, something slightly different than what you would expect from Meddy Bear. We are here to prove that doctors also have an artistic side to them.

We present to you a poem written by one of our fans, Ayam Chhatkuli from Nepal.

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

Sorrow of the dentist

Before I joined the med school

the focus of my sight was different

I used to see a whole human

All I see now is the teeth with calculus and stain.

 

When I see an old man walking

all I remember is a complete denture

I’m fed up with my prostho work

help me God I surrender

 

The man has a class I fracture

46 got a root stump

A life with no joy and rupture

Is equal to a dump

 

I come to encounter mainly 2 sorts of patients

Few are philosophical

And many are hysterical

 

People actually are very unhygienic

They bath with Quatar soap and have a Jean Patou’s spray

But use a single brush for 6 months

and walk with a grossly decayed tooth till the next may

 

Inside the heat of this mask

My beard failed to grow

Nose felt difficult to breath

Salivation decreased its flow

 

These days I dream of teeth

Good dreams angels appear as a canine

Bad dreams impacted lateral at age nine

She insists to describe her beauty

All I can see is her anterior cross-bite

with peg laterals

Falling in love for a dentist

is almost like winning the battles.

Which medical specialty is considered the most cerebral by other doctors? Why?

The question was asked on Quora byand answered by Liang-Hai Sie

It Would Depend on the Specialty of the Doctor Doing the Considering. There is an old joke which goes like this:

  • A GP doesn’t know anything and can’t do anything.
  • A Physician knows everything but can’t do anything.
  • A Surgeon doesn’t know anything but can do anything.
  • And lastly: The Pathologist is always right, but arrives too late….

Of course, in the present day’s situation there is no truth to that joke, but it shows how different kinds of medical specialist view each other & how they respect each other:

  • The Surgeons are annoyed by what they see as the Physicians’ indecision, meaning they take too long a time before reaching a conclusion.
  • The Physicians think the Surgeons are too Aggressive and Gung Ho, jumping in before everything is clear.
  • Surgeons and Physicians alike tended to dismiss the GP out of hand.

Tell us in a comment, which specialty do you think is the most respected one by other doctors and why?

Photo Credits: People image created by Javi_indy – Freepik.com