How To Save A Life: 10 Most Disgusting Medical Procedures That Could Be Life-Saving

Medicine has evolved from the development of lab-grown body parts to fecal transplants, shaping the way patients receive care. Despite their growing advancement, some medical procedures are bizarre and have yet to become accepted. Alltime 10s’s video, “10 Disgusting Medical Treatments That Could Save Your Life,” compiles a list of the most disgusting medical procedures ever performed that may make your stomach turn, but can actually save your life.

Nearly seven out of 10 Americans take at least one prescription drug, and half take two or more, with antibiotics being the most commonly prescribed, according to a study in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. These statistics reflect Americans’ great dependency on prescription drugs to treat health ailments. While these medications can help alleviate pains and aches, and combat illnesses, the U.S. and other countries have also resorted to animals and other weird sources to treat a variety of health conditions.

Drinking pulverized frogs blended with herbs for asthma and fertility issues is a common practice in Peru. Many natives also drink frog smoothies as a remedy for a low sex drive, but this has yet to be scientifically proven. Animal ingestion for asthma is also practiced in India, where asthmatics swallow a 5-centimeter fish in herbal paste. Thousands visit the one family who administers and claims the fish clears the throat.

The usage of human body parts also tops the bizarre medical treatments list that can save your life. Doctors have practiced natural orifice surgery by having their patients’ abdominal organs removed through their mouths or vaginas to avoid incisions. The first operation involved a gall bladder extracted through the mouth.

Another unusual yet fascinating medical procedure is a tooth transplant into a patient’s eye. Removing a tooth from a patient and placing it in the eye can restore sight. A hole that is drilled in the tooth holds a prosthetic lens that can correct corneal scats once implanted in the eye.

While some cultures swear by them, and others look away, these bizarre medical treatments have been able to save lives.

Click on Alltime 10s’s video for more disgusting medical cures, and see if you can stomach getting through the complete list.

Working Hours of Doctors According To Country

Resident duty hours around the globe: where are we now?

        • John Temple

      Background image created by Luis_molinero – Freepik.com

      BMC Medical Education201414(Suppl 1):S8

      DOI: 10.1186/1472-6920-14-S1-S8

      Published: 11 December 2014

      Abstract

      Safe and appropriate health care, especially in urgent or emergency situations, is the expectation of the public throughout the developed world. Achieving this goal requires appropriate levels of medical and other staff, appropriate training, and sensible working hours. Too often the brunt of such care, especially in out-of-hours situations, is borne by medical residents, who – to make matters worse – are frequently poorly supervised by more senior and experienced staff. Many jurisdictions have been alerted to this problem and are striving to correct it. However, the variation in attempts to restrict the actual hours worked by residents to “safe” levels is enormous, and all too often there is no consensus as to what should be put in place to achieve safe patient care. This paper sets out the current position for Europe, North America, and Australia.

      Introduction

      The volume of hours worked by medical residents has been a concern for years. The realization that tired, inexperienced, and poorly supervised doctors make more mistakes than those who are fresh, alert, and closely guided has become apparent everywhere. And yet there remains a huge variation in the implementation of controls over the actual hours worked, the environment available for learning, and the degree of real supervision afforded to these young professionals.

      Variation is seen both between countries with supposedly modern health care delivery systems and within the health systems of those countries themselves. What should be the role of medical residents? Should they be viewed as practitioners primarily, who provide service and attain further learning by clinical exposure (and, some would say, experience), or are they genuinely doctors in training, for whom every clinical event should be an appropriately supervised learning opportunity?

      The former system has resulted in a random, unstructured, arbitrary, and often patron-dependant method of acquiring the necessary skills to be competent for independent clinical practice. The latter process, which has gained more recognition if not actual implementation in recent times, still has a long way to go before it becomes the accepted and quicker route to senior levels of service and care delivery. This paper reports on some of the systems and situations around the globe concerning the statutory regulation—or lack of it—as to what constitutes good practice leading to appropriate training of young doctors and, ultimately, safer patient care.

      The case of Libby Zion, an 18-year-old woman who died while under the care of residents in a hospital emergency department in New York City in 1984, was the original stimulus to resident duty hour reform. The publicity that surrounded this case highlighted and subsequently influenced attempts to regulate the completely unrestricted hours worked by residents in hospital practice throughout the world. Subsequently, the lead in the journey of restricting hours was taken by Europe. The European Working Time Directive (EWTD), issued by the Council of Europe to protect the health and safety of all workers in the European Union, became law in 1998. It empowered a set of minimum requirements, including the following:

    • a maximum work week of 48 hours
    • a minimum rest period of 11 consecutive hours per 24-hour duty
    • a minimum rest period of 24 hours per 7-day duty, or 48 hours of rest per 14-day duty
    • a minimum of 4 weeks of paid annual leave
    • a maximum of 8 hours’ work in any 24 hours for workers in stressful positions
    • a minimum 20-minute rest period per 6 hours worked
    • The following section will review the outcome of the EWTD for medical residents since its implementation.

      Europe

      Official information remains extremely hard to gather or collate. An official European Union document reporting country-by-country compliance with the EWTD was due for publication in 2008 but has still not been released. The current situation of the 48-hour EWTD is as follows. There are beacons of achievement. Denmark has been compliant with the EWTD for many years and has a normal work week of 37 hours. Sweden and Germany indicate good compliance.

      Finland is probably compliant. The Netherlands reached compliance during 2011. Norway, which is affiliated with the European Union but is not a full member, trains young doctors in a weekly average of 45 hours. The United Kingdom reports compliance now, but recent research suggests that up to 25% of junior doctors are still working beyond the 48-hour limit. Compliance figures are not available for 11 countries, namely Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Portugal, Slovakia, and Slovenia. There is anecdotal evidence that many doctors in Spain, Ireland, Greece, and France are working more than the regulation 48-hour week, often without additional pay.

      Poor working conditions and excessive hours, but no hard data, are reported anecdotally in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and Romania. However, many of this latter group joined the European Union relatively recently and were not previously subject to the EWTD. In the United Kingdom, the full implementation of the 48-hour EWTD in August 2009 led to widespread concern about the ability of the National Health Service (NHS) to continue to deliver both high-quality training for its staff and safe clinical service. In the health care sector, the EWTD was found to affect only doctors and, more specifically, only those in the secondary care sector.

      The 2010 report Time for Training found that although “high quality training can be delivered in 48 hours” in the NHS, “this is precluded when trainees have a major role in out of hours service, are poorly supervised and access to learning is limited.” Thus, only 6 of the 27 European member states meet the prescribed standard, some 14 years after the EWTD became a legal requirement. In view of this lack of success, renegotiation of the 48-hour restriction, along with other factors, has been requested, but it will take a very long time for any revision to be agreed, let alone put into practice.

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What’s it like to perform surgery for the very first time?

Sure you’ll know what you’re doing and had plenty of practice on things that aren’t people. Sure you’ve watched others doing it. But what’s it like the very first time you cut somebody open to make them healthy? Is there extra fear of messing it up? Were you fairly confident?

(This question was originally posted on Quora, and below is a selection of the best relevant answers.)

Answers:

Robert Gluck

You’re one year old and taking your first steps. Your mom holds your hand as you waddle along with your little padded tush and she let’s go. You’re walking! Yeah! It’s all heavily scripted but what do you know? Mom makes sure that you’re well protected. No stairs. No sharp corners. You fall, you get up.

Training as a surgeon, the first few times you think you’re flying on your own…hopefully you’re not. But, what about that very first time when you’re really flying solo? On the other side of the blade, the scalpel, the lancet, the knife…on the receiving end of your services, is someone you were talking to a bit earlier. Or maybe it was their family. Or maybe not. Maybe it’s an emergency and you’ve never even met! One way or another, on the other side of the knife is someone who feels, who dreams, who lives a life. Someone with a past, a present, and a future that you will help shape…or un-shape. Someone who trusts. You.

They trust you. To get it right. To do your best. And maybe your mom’s not around. Or…you are the mom. And there’s no one else to ask. The buck stops here? So, through your exhilaration, your apprehension, your fear, you need to focus…your life depends on it. Well, as it so happens, not your life. Their life! Their pleasure, their pain, their existence. You deal. You are the house. Focus. Plan. Stay a step or two ahead. Biological systems are complex. Shit happens. Shit like unexpected bleeding. Like weird anatomy. Like infection. And later…Scarring. Recurrence. Metasteses. Wet and dirty bandages. Bandages that fall off. Are too tight. Patients who don’t listen. Patients who are scared and in pain. Your first surgery doesn’t begin and end in the OR. But for now…stay focused…cut sharp and think sharp!

Laszlo B. Tamas, Neurosurgeon with ties to the Bay area and Silicon Valley.

Memory is a filter, and I think mine is more of a filter than most. Frankly, I don’t remember my first surgery as an event. I remember trepidation, clumsiness, slowness, having to think about every step, and sometimes impatience and even hostility from the supervising surgeon.

And since then, a slow, steady growth in ability, understanding, of conscious movement becoming subconscious, of befriending margins without passing them to normal brain, of having an intuitive “feel” for the brain, gray and white matter (subtle), arteries, veins, arterialized veins, and now no longer having any anxiety about cases except for the most unusual and risky. And, looking back at the “surgeon” of 20 years ago, recognizing what a dolt I was! (and maybe not being so hard on the other young dolts I come across). Read all the answers here.

Average salaries for physicians depending on their specialty

According to the American medical group association “AMGA” report in 2006 this is a list of average salaries for physicians in USA. This list may help you if you are medical student or young doctor so you can choose the most suitable specialty for your capabilities and needs.

Orthopedic Surgery – Spine : $688,503

Orthopedic Surgery – Joint Replacement : $605,953

Neurological Surgery : $592,811

Cardiac & Thoracic Surgery : $533,084

Orthopedic Surgery : $500,672

Diagnostic Radiology – Interventional : $478,000

Orthopedic Surgery – Hand : $476,039

Transplant Surgery – Liver : $454,287

Diagnostic Radiology – Non-Interventional : $454,205

Radiation Therapy (M.D. only) : $447,250

Orthopedic Surgery – Pediatrics : $425,000

Trauma Surgery : $424,555

Pediatric Surgery : $419,783

Urology : $413,941

Vascular Surgery : $413,629

Gynecological Oncology : $413,500

Gastroenterology : $405,000

Cardiology : $402,000

Colon & Rectal Surgery : $394,723

Perinatology : $394,121

Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery : $390,142

Oral Surgery : $380,500

Dermatology : $375,176

Anesthesiology : $370,500

Otolaryngology : $368,777

Transplant Surgery – Kidney : $365,125

General Surgery : $357,091

Pathology (M.D. only) : $354,750

Nuclear Medicine (M.D. only) : $331,000

Hematology & Medical Oncology : $320,907

Reproductive Endocrinology : $317,312

Intensivist : $313,152

Pulmonary Disease : $306,829

Orthopedic-Medical : $297,348

Neonatology : $280,771

Gynecology & Obstetrics : $275,152

Obstetrics : $275,152

Pediatric Intensive Care : $272,000

Emergency Care : $267,293

Critical Care Medicine : $264,750

Hypertension & Nephrology : $259,677

Allergy & Immunology : $249,674

Pediatric Gastroenterology : $240,895

Ophthalmology : $238,200

Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation : $237,628

Neurology : $236,500

Pediatric Cardiology : $233,958

Gynecology : $232,075

Sports Medicine : $231,540

Infectious Disease : $227,750

Rheumatologic Disease : $224,000

Occupational / Environmental Medicine : $223,750

Urgent Care : $222,920

Pediatric Neurology : $219,561

Endocrinology : $218,855

Psychiatry – Child : $216,360

Hospitalist : $215,716

Psychiatry : $214,740

Internal Medicine : $214,307

Pediatric Hematology / Oncology : $212,577

Pediatrics & Adolescent : $209,873

Pediatric Infectious Disease : $209,680

Family Medicine – with Obstetrics : $209,565

Family Medicine : $208,861

Pediatric Pulmonary Disease : $201,841

Pediatric Nephrology : $198,686

Pediatric Allergy : $198,458

Pediatric Endocrinology : $187,957

Geriatrics : $187,602

Photo credit: People image created by Kues1 – Freepik.com

Why are lab coats and physician coats white colored?

The white coat gives a specific emotional response from patients.

Traditionally, they were beige, but white is synonymous with innocence, being trustworthy, cleanliness and life. In the past, doctors wore their street clothes most often or black, reflecting the mortality and frequent deaths seen in their chosen profession.

Today, the coats lend an air of professionalism and evoke feelings of a doctor’s superiority and intelligence in patients.

Recently, my sister received her white coat in a ceremony held at her medical school. Many medical schools do this as a rite of passage, symbolizing beginning a physician’s role. Some hospitals use the white coat to differentiate between nurses and doctors.

The white coat is currently being debated. In 2009, the American Medical Association voted to stop using the white coat Because it can harbor bacteria and germs, being worn from one visit with a patient to the next.

Essentially, today, the white coat evokes a feeling of confidence in patients. It says, “I’m a healer, a scientist, a trustworthy person with lots of school and training.”

Older people especially tend to like the white coat but more doctors are moving to just their everyday clothes or scrubs and a stethoscope draped around their neck.

Posted by Michelle Roses on Quora

The Darker Side Of Medicine: Another Doctor Assaulted While On Duty

Being a doctor is a noble calling. All those years spent in medical school, then specialization, more studying, sleepless nights on duty, etc… Learning never really ends when you decide to commit yourself to this profession.

It takes years, even decades for a person to become a good medical professional.

But, not everyone knows how to appreciate all the efforts a doctor has to go through his/her education.

Here is the story of Dr Mohammed Ruda, from Baghdad (Iraq). Dr Ruda is a resident in general surgery at the Sheikh Zayed Hospital in Iraq. He is currenty preparing his Phd in surgery.

While he was on call, this Wednesday, a female patient was admitted to the hospital. In the Emergency Room, she presented with severe right lower abdominal pain, with a possibilty of appendicitis. Dr Ruda came to examine the patient for rebound tenderness. 

But, what came next, no one could predict…..

Instead of helping the female patient, the doctor was hit in the face by the patient’s husband, who was against the medical check-up. He did not allow Dr.Ruda to examine his wife.

The doctor ended up with bloody nose and a possible fracture. (See picture below)

According to Dr Ruda’s colleagues, attacks like this one, are almost common thing in this hospital. That’s certanly not an environement anyone would want to work in.


When we talk about security in hospitals in general, it’s always directed toward a patient. But what about doctors?Cases like these show us that doctors are not safe in their own workplace.If the patients (or their family members) are free to assault a doctor, who is going to treat them later on?

We need to stop and think for a minute, as this kind of behavior should not be tolerated.

Complete medical personnel, from nurses, technicians, paramedics to doctors needs to be treated with respect and gratitude. Those people are the ones that put their lives aside, to save somebody else.

Recognize their effort, and show them you are thankful for their care and help.

Share if you care!

Image used: http://focus.cnhubei.com/consensus/200912/t883804.shtml

Which medical specialty is considered the most cerebral by other doctors? Why?

The question was asked on Quora byand answered by Liang-Hai Sie

It Would Depend on the Specialty of the Doctor Doing the Considering. There is an old joke which goes like this:

  • A GP doesn’t know anything and can’t do anything.
  • A Physician knows everything but can’t do anything.
  • A Surgeon doesn’t know anything but can do anything.
  • And lastly: The Pathologist is always right, but arrives too late….

Of course, in the present day’s situation there is no truth to that joke, but it shows how different kinds of medical specialist view each other & how they respect each other:

  • The Surgeons are annoyed by what they see as the Physicians’ indecision, meaning they take too long a time before reaching a conclusion.
  • The Physicians think the Surgeons are too Aggressive and Gung Ho, jumping in before everything is clear.
  • Surgeons and Physicians alike tended to dismiss the GP out of hand.

Tell us in a comment, which specialty do you think is the most respected one by other doctors and why?

Photo Credits: People image created by Javi_indy – Freepik.com

How Smart are Medical Doctors?

OK, I know that’s a slightly contentious phrasing of the question 😉

I mean, is being a medical doctor an intellectually demanding job?

Traditionally this is obviously true. Doctors have had to spend years learning a lot of information (about the body and its symptoms) and spent those years in education surrounded by other clever and ambitious people.

Now that more of this information can be looked up in databases, more diagnoses rely on automated equipment (driven by radiographers etc.) and more treatments depend on prescribing a course of drugs designed elsewhere (by pharmaceutical researchers) does doctoring still have the same profile? Or is it more about interpersonal skills (bedside manner, reassurance). Is being a good doctor becoming more like being a good nurse?

This question was posted on Quora  and answered by Liang-Hai Sie 

Let me answer as a retired doc who had had 40 years of experience with clinical (not research) work as a doc, for decades also working with a lot of young bright eyed docs who were part of our house staff.

Those who have graduated as a MD at least have a IQ of 120 to 130, so you need some intelligence, but need not be a genius.

As for the junior doctors, those having graduated with honors are often so occupied doing everything so perfect that they lose sight of the practical way of running things, so aren’t finished until late in the evening often 10pm which can’t be good, the less brilliant colleagues usually finish between 5 and 7 pm, so are better able at not spending lots of time by trying to be perfect.
I would gladly take a smart enough but not brilliant practical doc to work with me or be my partner.
EDIT:
having a lot of information on the web doesn’t mean a doctor needs no knowledge at all.  To look something up (where can one find useful information, what information does one need etc.) one will need basic knowledge, a lot of information at your fingertip, imagine having to look up everything on every patient, won’t work, and won’t inspire any confidence either.  The art of practicing medicine fortunately is not just following a recipe.

and by Emily Altman

In order to order all those tests that supposedly tell doctors all the answers, you have to have at least a differential diagnosis of what possible illness or condition the patient may have.  That means you have to know how to examine the patient and know what factors are important in the medical history/family history and review of systems.  Then having ordered tests (if necessary, because a doctor may know what the problem is without needing tests or equipment) you have to put the information together to come up with a diagnosis, determine what treatments would benefit the patient and then administer those treatments.

The ability to learn and synthesize learned information (if we can define smart by those terms) is tested many times along the way from high school to post-residency/fellowship MD.  So, yes, we do have objective proof that doctors (and I am proud to be one) are smart.

Doctors are the proverbial sight for the three blind men and an elephant that you are proposing with pharmaceutical researchers and automated programs and devices. That’s because they know how to put information together and not base their judgments and decisions only from the standpoint of a pharmaceutical researcher or an MRI machine.

Nurses do know a lot about diseases and how to take care of patients, but their education and training is not geared towards diagnosis and proposing a treatment as much as patient observation and administering the treatments.  And I might add I learned tons from nurses, especially as an intern in the ICU with experienced, smart nurses who knew exactly what they were doing and were a tremendous asset.

As for programs and devices, just remember the GIGO Law.  It’s truly garbage in garbage out.  If you give a program random facts about a patient, it will come up with a list of possibilities, but it cannot decide what the problem is.

Photo credits Technology image created by Creativeart – Freepik.com

Funny Moments of Doctors during their shift

1. A man comes into the ER and yells, “My wife’s going to have her baby in the cab!” I grabbed my stuff, rushed out to the cab, lifted the lady’s dress, and began to take off her underwear. Suddenly I noticed that there were several cabs -and I was in the wrong one.
Submitted by Dr. Mark MacDonald

2. At the beginning of my shift I placed a stethoscope on an elderly and slightly deaf female patient’s anterior chest wall. “Big breaths,” I instructed. “Yes, they used to be,” replied the patient.
Submitted by Dr. Richard Byrnes

3. One day I had to be the bearer of bad news when I told a wife that her husband had died of a massive myocardial infarct. Not more than five minutes later, I heard her reporting to the rest of the family that he had died of a “massive internal fart.”
Submitted by Dr. Susan Steinberg

4. During a patient’s two week follow-up appointment with his cardiologist, he informed me, his doctor, that he was having trouble with one of his medications. “Which one? ” I asked. “The patch. The nurse told me to put on a new one every six ours and now I’m running out of places to put It!” I had him quickly undress and discovered what I hoped I wouldn’t see. Yes, the man had over fifty patches on his body! Now, the instructions include removal of the old patch before applying a new one.
Submitted by Dr. Rebecca St. Clair

5. While acquainting myself with a new elderly patient, I asked, “How long have you been bedridden?” After a look of complete confusion She answered…”Why, not for about twenty years – when my husband was alive.”
Submitted by Dr. Steven Swanson

6. I was caring for a woman and asked, “So how’s your breakfast this morning?” “It’s very good, except for the Kentucky Jelly. I can’t seem to get used to the taste,” the patient replied. I then asked to see the jelly and the woman produced a foil packet labeled “KY Jelly.”
Submitted by Dr. Leonard Kransdorf

7. A nurse was on duty in the Emergency Room, when a young woman with purple hair styled into a punk rocker Mohawk, sporting a variety of tattoos, and wearing strange clothing, entered. It was quickly determined that the patient had acute appendicitis, so she was scheduled for immediate surgery. When she was completely disrobed on the operating table, the staff noticed that her pubic hair had been dyed green, and above it there was a tattoo that read, “Keep off the grass.” Once the surgery was completed, the surgeon wrote a short note on the patient’s dressing, which said, “Sorry, had to mow the lawn.”
Submitted by RN no name

8. As a new, young MD doing his residency in OB, I was quite embarrassed when performing female pelvic exams To cover my embarrassment I had unconsciously formed a habit of whistling softly. The middle-aged lady upon whom I was performing this exam suddenly burst out laughing and further embarrassing me. I looked up from my work and sheepishly said, “I’m sorry. Was I tickling you?”
She replied, “No doctor, but the song you were whistling was, ‘I wish I was an Oscar MeyerWiener’!”.
Dr. wouldn’t submit his name

Why Doctors Are Unhappy

As a medical student, I was often unhappy. I would be stressed about the next exam, downtrodden after a surgeon just yelled at me in the OR, or worried that I may not match into the residency of my choice. These are just some of the feelings that doctors-in-training experience every day.

Becoming a physician is no easy task. In the United States, it often takes 11-15 years of education after high school: 4 years of college, 4 years of medical school, and 3-7 years of residency. Along the way, you are faced with competitive admission committees, difficult exams, and uncertainty of whether you will make it all the way through.

Why put up with all of this stress and anxiety? Because young doctors are often looking forward to a “good life” later on. Not only are doctors viewed as financially well-off, but they are also among the highest respected professions in society. Therefore, we deal with what we have to in order to become physicians.

The promise of future salvation keeps us going. However, now that I’ve taken a leave of absence from medical school for two years to pursue an MBA, I’ve had the chance to reflect on the past three years of my medical school career. I recently read the book The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle. In it, is the secret to why so many future doctors (and doctors) are unhappy.

There is no such thing as future salvation.

Eckhart Tolle stresses that if you are always looking forward to happiness in the future, then you will never be happy at all. You can only be happy in the now. If you are not happy now, then don’t expect to be happy later. Be happy now or be miserable forever.

But searching for future salvation is exactly what medical students, residents, and even physicians do. We are willing to put in the time and energy to become physicians because of the idea of delayed gratification. We’ll work our tails off now so that later we can live a life in which we can provide great care to our patients, get paid well for doing it, and live a more balanced life.

But that is a flawed mentality. I realize now that I was always looking forward to getting something over with in medical school: the next block of curriculum, the next United States Medical Licensing Exam, the next clinical rotation, etc. Once I got done with that one thing, I would hope that my life would be a little better. But it wasn’t.

And that is what we, as future physicians, do. We expect that life will be better once we are done with premed, medical school, and residency. But it doesn’t get better. It will stay the same…unless you change your mentality.

Enjoy the now. Enjoy studying for the organic chemistry test as a premedical student. Enjoy rotating through internal medicine as a medical student. Enjoy working 80-hour weeks as a resident. If you do not enjoy your current situation, you will not enjoy your future one. As Eckhart Tolle states, “Nothing has happened in the past; it happened in the Now. Nothing will ever happen in the future; it will happen in the Now.”

Be happy now. It is the only way to be happy ever.

Shaan Patel is the founder of 2400 Expert Test Prep, a #1 bestselling author, and MD/MBA student at Yale and USC. He raised his own SAT score from average to perfect and teaches students his methods in an online SAT prep class.

THE STORY BEHIND OUR PICTURE OF MESSY OPERATING ROOM

For those you know us and follow us, you may remember the image we shared on our facebook page that clearly describing what’s really going on in the operation room.

Originally, the image was taken in ER in Israel but the exact location we didn’t share because of privacy reasons.

(THE IMAGE CONTAINS GRAPHIC CONTENT – You can see the image here.)

The main goal and the purpose of the image was to raise awareness, not just to the medical stuff it self, but to all patients and family that are waiting in our hospitals halls or waiting rooms. There is a lot of violence against the medical team these days. In Israel a while ago one nurse was burned until death by a patient and we hear a lot of similar cases also in India and other countries.

The moment we shared the image, it went viral. Today, on facebook it has 20 million reach, 69 thousands of reactions and more than 150,000 shares combine on different facebook pages.

Huffington post made a article about this. The original article is in German language and you can find it on this link.

Like we sad, the aim of the picture is to raise awareness and show the reason behind the long waiting on ER, so people with smaller injuries understand why they wait because someone else is fighting for his life.

We truly hope that we can make some changes on the global opinion regarding the doctors. They are fighting for our lives every day. They are our heroes, but they are also human beings. Don’t forget that.

 

‘Fear Not, This Is Normal’: Advice for Young Doctors

Medscape asked some of our contributors and our community to offer advice to soon-to-be residents. The responses that poured in went far beyond the expected tips to help achieve success during residency. Most submissions included insights from years of professional experience, along with wisdom to help all young doctors, not just those in training. In fact, the scope of the advice is likely to trigger reflection in those of all ages.

Here are just a few highlights of what they had to say. Prime Directive One of the themes that emerged among the advice that was offered involved a need to prioritize. Dr Brad Spellberg suggested that times have changed. He told us, “We must engage our patients in decision-making and move away from the traditional, physician-centric paternalism of medicine, which is contrary to achieving high-quality, safe, efficient, and patient-centered care.” Dr Spellberg was not alone in suggesting a shift from “physician-centric” attitudes. An emphasis on listening to, and learning from, patients was repeated as a guiding dictum. As Dr J. Greensmith explained, “The patients are your best teachers, followed by the nurses, then your attendings.”

In fact, developing a fast appreciation for nurses was another common refrain. Dr Mark Morris was explicit, as he laid out his advice: “Please remember that the only thing between you and disaster is the nurses. Honor them; respect them; and, if you’re a DO, treat them. Don’t go to sleep when you first can; sit and talk with them, learn from them. And they will feed you and protect your sleep.” Much of the advice suggested considering those who surround young doctors as new family units.

These groups include nurses and fellow residents, and beyond residency, peers who will grow to be very familiar faces. Cheerfully, Dr Brent Mothner offered, “Never pass up the opportunity for a meeting, or even a quick coffee together. Great things can happen simply by chatting along the way. Oh, and good cookies make almost any day better!” A Resident State of Mind In terms of advice specific to the residency experience, Dr Lisa Gobar offered some quality reassurance: “You are starting all over again. You will feel like you know nothing. Fear not, this is normal.” Encouragement permeated the advice provided from our contributors and users, with many sharing personal stories of doubt that gave way to experience.

The overwhelming attitude was that although young doctors are sure to face personal crises, they can be overcome. While accepting that a certain amount of fear is normal, other situations in residency can be avoided with preparation. As Dr Merius Atangcho specified, “Scan the ACGME curriculum requirements.

Probably no medical student ever looks at ACGME curriculum/resident experience requirements to graduate from a residency. Especially when deciding between different fields, however, these requirements can inform you of what your entire residency will look like.” Others recommended concrete suggestions that involved surveying the medical literature thoroughly and learning to approach the resident experience as a rebirth. The full article you can read it on medscape.