The Darker Side Of Medicine: Another Doctor Assaulted While On Duty

Being a doctor is a noble calling. All those years spent in medical school, then specialization, more studying, sleepless nights on duty, etc… Learning never really ends when you decide to commit yourself to this profession.

It takes years, even decades for a person to become a good medical professional.

But, not everyone knows how to appreciate all the efforts a doctor has to go through his/her education.

Here is the story of Dr Mohammed Ruda, from Baghdad (Iraq). Dr Ruda is a resident in general surgery at the Sheikh Zayed Hospital in Iraq. He is currenty preparing his Phd in surgery.

While he was on call, this Wednesday, a female patient was admitted to the hospital. In the Emergency Room, she presented with severe right lower abdominal pain, with a possibilty of appendicitis. Dr Ruda came to examine the patient for rebound tenderness. 

But, what came next, no one could predict…..

Instead of helping the female patient, the doctor was hit in the face by the patient’s husband, who was against the medical check-up. He did not allow Dr.Ruda to examine his wife.

The doctor ended up with bloody nose and a possible fracture. (See picture below)

According to Dr Ruda’s colleagues, attacks like this one, are almost common thing in this hospital. That’s certanly not an environement anyone would want to work in.


When we talk about security in hospitals in general, it’s always directed toward a patient. But what about doctors?Cases like these show us that doctors are not safe in their own workplace.If the patients (or their family members) are free to assault a doctor, who is going to treat them later on?

We need to stop and think for a minute, as this kind of behavior should not be tolerated.

Complete medical personnel, from nurses, technicians, paramedics to doctors needs to be treated with respect and gratitude. Those people are the ones that put their lives aside, to save somebody else.

Recognize their effort, and show them you are thankful for their care and help.

Share if you care!

Image used: http://focus.cnhubei.com/consensus/200912/t883804.shtml

What is a “High-Risk” Pregnancy?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCXI5G2gzaI

Angela Chiodo, CNM Certified Nurse-Midwife: So there’s a number of things that can make a pregnant person high risk. So obesity, being over 35, if you have high blood pressure. If you’re coming into the pregnancy with other medical problems. Diabetes, or substance abuse issues.

Fonda Mitchell, MD OB/GYN: For your obstetrician what that means is we need to assess you a little closer and maybe a little bit more frequently. It does not mean that there is no potential for a healthy outcome and delivery with this pregnancy.

Leslie, 30 Weeks Pregnant: All of my pregnancies have been considered high risk. Because I was 35 when I had him. 38 when I had him. And now I’m 42.

Fonda Mitchell, MD OB/GYN: So age can be a factor. Because we’re dealing with an increased possibility of associated genetic abnormalities or birth defects.

Stella Dantas, MD OB/GYN: Sometimes when you’re over the age of 35 you have a higher risk of developing other medical conditions during pregnancy. Like diabetes of pregnancy, or hypertension of pregnancy, or preeclampsia.

Ebony, Nine Weeks Pregnant: I was concerned about being high risk when I decided to get pregnant, because of my age, I am 40. But my doctor did prepare me and let me know that there were different things that I could do to make sure that I had a healthy pregnancy. And I know several women who have had pregnancies late in life, and have had healthy children, and good pregnancies.

Stella Dantas, MD OB/GYN: We follow everybody very closely in pregnancy. We will let you know if there are things that are concerning. If you need extra tests during your pregnancy.

Julia Barnes, MD OB/GYN: Especially later in pregnancy, there’s something called a non-stress test, where it was specifically listen a little bit longer for the baby’s heart beat. And measure the fluid around the baby once or twice a week, depending upon the medical problem just to make sure everything’s going well.

Lissa Daimaru-Enoki, MD OB/GYN: We try to work with those moms so that they have the healthiest pregnancy possible. Looking at what they can do to improve their outcomes and have the healthiest pregnancy possible.