5 kinds of Doctors you’ll come across in a hospital

So after graduating from the Medical school I realized that it wasn’t so bad. Just kidding. It was bad. But then again I had loads of fun too. Anyways so when I looked back at my five years as a medical student I realized that both the fun part of a rotation and the misery was almost entirely dependent on the doctor I was rotating with. So based on my observation I categorized my mentors into five groups.

1. THE REALLY COOL DOC: “The name’s Bond, James Bond” .. Seriously, did you lose your way to the theater and end up in a hospital? As you watch this spic and span doctor enter with everything in place and a smile to top it all up you realize this is who you want to be. During his rounds he is empathetic and caring and knows his stuff well. Wow. Could it get any better? Best of all he gives you a chance to speak and make your point without passing any unwanted remarks or judgments. So by the end of your rotation you are all confident, you have gained some knowledge about the rotation and you are still yearning to learn more from this guy. Best time ever!

2. DOCTOR FRANKENSTEIN: “You rang?” When you first see this guy all you can think of is Lurch from The Addams family. I mean did you sleep well in the mortuary last night doctor? Or maybe say hello to the cadavers sir. This doctor looks totally shabby and is definitely sleep walking half the time in the hospital hallways. Now there is a 50/50 chance of him teaching you anything during the rotation depending upon his sleep deprivation status. But the best part is that he won’t notice your absence so all the more to be late on a round or take a tour to the cafeteria without getting into trouble. All in all, fun but not exciting.

3. Le MISERABLE DOCTOR: His wife left him, the system doesn’t care for him, the worlds coming to an end and medical students should never have graduated are the lines you keep hearing from this one. He will be least interested in teaching you any constructive stuff. All you’ll hear will be complaints and more complaints until you realize that people like him are the reason for the high suicidal rates among the doctors. This rotation passed slower than the rest and by the end of it you may have probably ordered yourself a .45 pistol on Ebay. Terrible time of the year this one.

4. THE SARCASTIC ONE: This guy will keep you on your toes 24/7. Leaving no opportunity to make you feel like crap and passing snide remarks each time you get something wrong you realize why people hate doctors so much. Now there is an 80% chance that this one will be a surgeon (not that I have anything against the surgeons. Purely my personal experience. No offence) God complex, perfectionism and constant urge to humiliate someone are some of the weapons he’ll carry around. By the end of this rotation you’ll be turning in a Le Miserable Doctor yourself and wondering whether to shoot him or yourself with that gun you purchased from Ebay.

5. THE OPPRESSED ONE: This guy will remind you of your childhood days. When there was this kid who everyone used to bully for no apparent reason. And he wouldn’t stand up for himself rather always act like he had Stockholm Syndrome. So during your rounds you’ll realize that instead of looking up to him as a mentor he is looking up to you. He is just sad. At first you get a thrill at getting the authority (Hmmm.. So this is how you end up becoming “The Sarcastic Doctor”) but then you get a feeling of guilt and try to cheer him up and act helpful during rotations. You should probably carry a pack of tissues just in case an emotional scene erupts between you two. But this rotation will teach you how to use authority and yet remain humble.

Photo credits:Hand image created by Jannoon028 – Freepik.com

How To Save A Life: 10 Most Disgusting Medical Procedures That Could Be Life-Saving

Medicine has evolved from the development of lab-grown body parts to fecal transplants, shaping the way patients receive care. Despite their growing advancement, some medical procedures are bizarre and have yet to become accepted. Alltime 10s’s video, “10 Disgusting Medical Treatments That Could Save Your Life,” compiles a list of the most disgusting medical procedures ever performed that may make your stomach turn, but can actually save your life.

Nearly seven out of 10 Americans take at least one prescription drug, and half take two or more, with antibiotics being the most commonly prescribed, according to a study in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. These statistics reflect Americans’ great dependency on prescription drugs to treat health ailments. While these medications can help alleviate pains and aches, and combat illnesses, the U.S. and other countries have also resorted to animals and other weird sources to treat a variety of health conditions.

Drinking pulverized frogs blended with herbs for asthma and fertility issues is a common practice in Peru. Many natives also drink frog smoothies as a remedy for a low sex drive, but this has yet to be scientifically proven. Animal ingestion for asthma is also practiced in India, where asthmatics swallow a 5-centimeter fish in herbal paste. Thousands visit the one family who administers and claims the fish clears the throat.

The usage of human body parts also tops the bizarre medical treatments list that can save your life. Doctors have practiced natural orifice surgery by having their patients’ abdominal organs removed through their mouths or vaginas to avoid incisions. The first operation involved a gall bladder extracted through the mouth.

Another unusual yet fascinating medical procedure is a tooth transplant into a patient’s eye. Removing a tooth from a patient and placing it in the eye can restore sight. A hole that is drilled in the tooth holds a prosthetic lens that can correct corneal scats once implanted in the eye.

While some cultures swear by them, and others look away, these bizarre medical treatments have been able to save lives.

Click on Alltime 10s’s video for more disgusting medical cures, and see if you can stomach getting through the complete list.

If you had to choose between becoming an engineer or a doctor, what would you choose?

This question was posted on Quora and was answered by Liang-Hai Sie
Both our daughter and I myself had faced this choice, 10 and 50 years ago.

Becoming a doctor:

  • after high school, it takes between 9 to 13 years before one can practice on his/her own, if you need to take out a student loan, you will spent the first 10 years after finishing residency paying off your debt so you can start living after being 40-45 years old.
  • The working week is long, your profession will impact heavily on your private life, without a supportive partner you couldn’t have a happy family life.
  • in many parts of the world finding a job wouldn’t be a problem (it is now in The Netherlands), and the pay often is quite OK, when compared to engineers, but will vary widely depending of your specialty.

source: Medscape: Medscape Access

Becoming an engineer:

  • It takes “just” 5 years after high school to graduate, after that engineers will go on educating/training themselves on the job, but have a decent paying job, unlike the underpaid resident doctors in training for medical specialist often making ± $ 60,000 a year.
  • In many countries income would be lower than a doctor’s, but social life would be better because of the more civilized working hours.
  • according to Engineering Salaries on the Rise – ASME in the US engineers make an average income of $ 103,400.- including bonuses.
  • people’s skill are also very much needed if one aims for a management position.

When I was at high school, I always thought I would become an engineer, but just before graduation decided that was too hard to do, studying medicine seemed to be better suited to me, my father, my uncle, my older siblings and cousins either were docs or were doing med school, and not complaining, so I decided to become a doctor, and never regretted it.

When 10+ years ago our daughter was to graduate from high school, having chosen a very versatile “study profile” making it possible for her to do both med school and engineering, the thought that it took between 9 up to 13 years after high school before she could practice independently, contrasting with a “mere” 5 years doing engineering, made her chose to do biomedical technology over medicine, what she “always” had wanted to do. No financing problems here since tuition was just around € 1,650 yearly and everybody got a government sponsored scholarship, after a few years a loan with just 2,5% interest if you took >1 year longer to graduate, or transferred to another faculty.
After 1,5 year she became disappointed at not working with people which she felt was so important for her life, just a lot of mathematical formula’s, so she stopped doing engineering, not knowing what next to do with herself, then almost 20 yo. After a lot of doubts her old interest (medicine) surfaced again, this time being a bit older better equipped to see the consequences, she decided it was to be either med school or psychology.
So she interviewed a psychiatrist uncle, his psychologist wife, one of my female partners, married with a child, on how they experienced their private and professional life, and with the last lady doc how she arranged her household and child care with both parents working as medical specialists, also our head of psychology department at that time the Secretary of the Dutch Psychologist’s Union.
At the end she chose med school.
She became a lot happier after being admitted to med school.
Now she’s an MD Ph.D candidate, very happy with her research job, but having great uncertainty what to do next this fall after finishing her Ph.D, since at present it’s very difficult for young medical specialists to find suitable openings, at present around 50 young surgeons have no paid jobs, just working at the hospital where they did their last residency without pay so not to lose their dexterity and certification. Others do locums. In the specialism she wanted to do clinical genetics the University had to let people go due to budget cuts, sometimes after a 10 year tenure… Very unsettling, especially since these highly specialized docs aren’t equipped to do other medical work without first doing retraining. Imagine this happening to you at around 45 yo.
EDIT: we now have 168 young medical specialist on Social Welfare out of a total of 670 jobless medical doctors (spring 2015)

Wishing you all the wisdom in your choice.

EDIT 2016: our daughter who after attaining her Ph.D worked as a post doctoral researcher, at the same time supervising two junior would be Ph.D students, could live with the publication pressure they all had to deal with, so left academis on the brink of a burn out, took 10 months to recover, and now has started a new life as a Information Analyst bridging the divide between clinical docs and ICT. At present she’s very happy at her new job, being able to make enough money while working 4 day weeks, no longer under such pressure as in academia.

Which is the best country to work in as a doctor?

This question was posted in Quora by Liang-Hai Sie
These are just a few thought where people say it’s difficult or good to work as a doctor.
The not so good stories are from:
-Eastern Europe: for most the pay is low, so many are unsatisfied
-Italy: most medical specialist aren’t paid so well
-UK: loss of control how to manage one’s practice is said to lead to a lot of burn-out?
-Germany: working hours are long, secondary job benefits are less than e.g. in The Netherlands
-SE Asia: in the more developed countries working hours are long, income is good, social standing good.  I think in the poorer countries all is a lot less.
-China: pay is not good, long working hours.


This is from a survey on burn-out in Chinese vs US physicians:
It is manageable and I’m not making any changes (36% vs 25%)
It is manageable but I need to make some changes in hours/workload/etc. (52.2% vs 62%)
I am thinking of leaving my current position (7.3% vs 7%)
I am thinking of leaving medicine altogether (4.5% vd 5%)

Financial position Chinese vd US physicians:

At present still OK:

-Scandinavian countries: working hours were quite OK, income relatively low, but one could have a good private life.  No problems with people unable to afford their essential medical care.
-The Netherlands: at present income and working conditions are still OK, but docs are losing more and more income and their say about how their practice are organized. Universal health care, people are mandatory insured for essential health care.
-USA??  Income if not a primary care physician is quite alright, high student loans, the threat of being sued, but all in all docs and partners are quite satisfied.

From:  Medscape: Medscape Access
Physician Lifestyles — Linking to Burnout: A Medscape Survey


As for partner satisfaction, as long you have more than two hours of face time a day, is high: 70%  See Elsevier The Medical Marriage: A National Survey of the Spouses/Partners of US Physicians (unfortunately at present only accessible to subscribers or if you pay for access)

Why do I feel sleepy when I start studying? What can I do?

This question was originally posted on Quora. Answer 1 by: Alaka Halder, Princeton University ’15

A2A. Studying for the SAT wasn’t my favourite task in the world either, so I’ll share some of the things I did:

  • Get away from your computer and other distractions. You’ve already pointed out that having all those soft copies of SAT guides is pretty useless if you’re on edX all the time. So print out those soft copies, or better yet, buy some hard copy SAT guides. I think they smell nice 😛
  • I hated reading the SAT guide. You’re being tested on what you learned in high school anyway, and I didn’t feel that I was benefiting from reading/passive reading. So I took a lot of practice tests instead of “studying”, and checked my answers against the answers manual. If I got something wrong, I tried to figure out why. It’s hard to get distracted when you’re actively engaged in something like test taking.
  • A technique that you might find helpful for building your studying stamina is the very simple Pomodoro method (Lifehacker: The Pomodoro Technique Trains Your Brain Away From Distractions):

    Developed in the 1990s, the Pomodoro technique uses a timer and a simple concept: write down a task, work on that task for 25 minutes without interruption, and then take a break for five minutes. It takes the pressure off the task, and discourages multitasking. The goal is to pace yourself through the task, while still maintaining progress. This method enables you to concentrate without distractions, and encourages deep thinking,

    Lifehacker

    Anyone can concentrate for 25 minutes. After you’ve worked for four 25 minute chunks, give yourself a longer break (e.g. 15 minutes). I know people find this helpful if they’re procrastinating a lot, or if they find themselves retaining too little of what they’re studying. The remain answers are here.

What’s it like to perform surgery for the very first time?

Sure you’ll know what you’re doing and had plenty of practice on things that aren’t people. Sure you’ve watched others doing it. But what’s it like the very first time you cut somebody open to make them healthy? Is there extra fear of messing it up? Were you fairly confident?

(This question was originally posted on Quora, and below is a selection of the best relevant answers.)

Answers:

Robert Gluck

You’re one year old and taking your first steps. Your mom holds your hand as you waddle along with your little padded tush and she let’s go. You’re walking! Yeah! It’s all heavily scripted but what do you know? Mom makes sure that you’re well protected. No stairs. No sharp corners. You fall, you get up.

Training as a surgeon, the first few times you think you’re flying on your own…hopefully you’re not. But, what about that very first time when you’re really flying solo? On the other side of the blade, the scalpel, the lancet, the knife…on the receiving end of your services, is someone you were talking to a bit earlier. Or maybe it was their family. Or maybe not. Maybe it’s an emergency and you’ve never even met! One way or another, on the other side of the knife is someone who feels, who dreams, who lives a life. Someone with a past, a present, and a future that you will help shape…or un-shape. Someone who trusts. You.

They trust you. To get it right. To do your best. And maybe your mom’s not around. Or…you are the mom. And there’s no one else to ask. The buck stops here? So, through your exhilaration, your apprehension, your fear, you need to focus…your life depends on it. Well, as it so happens, not your life. Their life! Their pleasure, their pain, their existence. You deal. You are the house. Focus. Plan. Stay a step or two ahead. Biological systems are complex. Shit happens. Shit like unexpected bleeding. Like weird anatomy. Like infection. And later…Scarring. Recurrence. Metasteses. Wet and dirty bandages. Bandages that fall off. Are too tight. Patients who don’t listen. Patients who are scared and in pain. Your first surgery doesn’t begin and end in the OR. But for now…stay focused…cut sharp and think sharp!

Laszlo B. Tamas, Neurosurgeon with ties to the Bay area and Silicon Valley.

Memory is a filter, and I think mine is more of a filter than most. Frankly, I don’t remember my first surgery as an event. I remember trepidation, clumsiness, slowness, having to think about every step, and sometimes impatience and even hostility from the supervising surgeon.

And since then, a slow, steady growth in ability, understanding, of conscious movement becoming subconscious, of befriending margins without passing them to normal brain, of having an intuitive “feel” for the brain, gray and white matter (subtle), arteries, veins, arterialized veins, and now no longer having any anxiety about cases except for the most unusual and risky. And, looking back at the “surgeon” of 20 years ago, recognizing what a dolt I was! (and maybe not being so hard on the other young dolts I come across). Read all the answers here.

Can a schizophrenic become a doctor?

17 this year, and I have interest in pursuing medicine after I clear my national exams. Say if I can manage my symptoms well with an exception of a few relapses and do well in my national exams in the next three years, would this illness in any way, hinder me from getting into a medical school?

This question was originally posted on Quora, which was answered by Susan Winslow, 25 years Certified Psychiatric Nurse 

Yes, a person with schizophrenia can become a doctor and people have. However it is challenging and I will tell you why. Simply put, inordinate amounts of stress bring on relapses. With each relapse a person with schizophrenia has they increase their liklihood of having another relapse ( it is the same with cancer) . With each relaspse a person suffers the more damage is done to the brain in the areas of higher executive functioning ( in the prefontal cortex). This is the area of the brain required to study, train and actually practice as a doctor.

As a nurse who has spent the majority of my career in a teaching medical center and have worked side be side medical students, residents, and attending physicians this is one of most stressful professions I can think of entering. It is not only stressful on your mind it is also stressful on your body , on your family life and on you emotionally. I could go on and on but since I don’t have the space to do that I would suggest through your school , you ask to shadow a doctor at a local hospital or in your local emergency room, just to see what a “ day in the life “ is like.

That will give you an idea of how busy they can be, how often they need to switch gears, deal with emergencies, give extremely sad news to family members, listen to people who don’t agree with what you have told them, get yelled at, keep up with documentation, put off going to the restroom, are expected to know everything, perform miracles and have all the time in the world for each patient, maybe get 15 minutes for lunch, have memories like steel traps, and treat every one with respect, concern and dignity and chances are you are doing this on very little sleep.

I am not trying to discourage you . This is real life as a doctor. Being a resident is even harder because you are trying to proove yourself in order to become a doctor. With the illness of schizophrenia I would think long and hard and do lots of first hand work to see if you could actually see yourself doing the job and managing the illness. Your illness requires little to no stress, at least 7–8 hrs of sleep per night, three well balanced meals per day, adequate amounts of exercise to move your bigger muscle groups, time spent at rest, a very good support network, and fun activities.

I myself can think of other careers that involve medicine that wouldn’t jeopardize your health for instance nursing, nurse practitioner, many areas of research, medical ethics, medical law, medical IT ( the fatest growing career right now) etc.

Give it some thought, so many careers but your health is your top priority ! My Best.

What do you think? Let us know in the comment bellow.

Why are lab coats and physician coats white colored?

The white coat gives a specific emotional response from patients.

Traditionally, they were beige, but white is synonymous with innocence, being trustworthy, cleanliness and life. In the past, doctors wore their street clothes most often or black, reflecting the mortality and frequent deaths seen in their chosen profession.

Today, the coats lend an air of professionalism and evoke feelings of a doctor’s superiority and intelligence in patients.

Recently, my sister received her white coat in a ceremony held at her medical school. Many medical schools do this as a rite of passage, symbolizing beginning a physician’s role. Some hospitals use the white coat to differentiate between nurses and doctors.

The white coat is currently being debated. In 2009, the American Medical Association voted to stop using the white coat Because it can harbor bacteria and germs, being worn from one visit with a patient to the next.

Essentially, today, the white coat evokes a feeling of confidence in patients. It says, “I’m a healer, a scientist, a trustworthy person with lots of school and training.”

Older people especially tend to like the white coat but more doctors are moving to just their everyday clothes or scrubs and a stethoscope draped around their neck.

Posted by Michelle Roses on Quora

The Darker Side Of Medicine: Another Doctor Assaulted While On Duty

Being a doctor is a noble calling. All those years spent in medical school, then specialization, more studying, sleepless nights on duty, etc… Learning never really ends when you decide to commit yourself to this profession.

It takes years, even decades for a person to become a good medical professional.

But, not everyone knows how to appreciate all the efforts a doctor has to go through his/her education.

Here is the story of Dr Mohammed Ruda, from Baghdad (Iraq). Dr Ruda is a resident in general surgery at the Sheikh Zayed Hospital in Iraq. He is currenty preparing his Phd in surgery.

While he was on call, this Wednesday, a female patient was admitted to the hospital. In the Emergency Room, she presented with severe right lower abdominal pain, with a possibilty of appendicitis. Dr Ruda came to examine the patient for rebound tenderness. 

But, what came next, no one could predict…..

Instead of helping the female patient, the doctor was hit in the face by the patient’s husband, who was against the medical check-up. He did not allow Dr.Ruda to examine his wife.

The doctor ended up with bloody nose and a possible fracture. (See picture below)

According to Dr Ruda’s colleagues, attacks like this one, are almost common thing in this hospital. That’s certanly not an environement anyone would want to work in.


When we talk about security in hospitals in general, it’s always directed toward a patient. But what about doctors?Cases like these show us that doctors are not safe in their own workplace.If the patients (or their family members) are free to assault a doctor, who is going to treat them later on?

We need to stop and think for a minute, as this kind of behavior should not be tolerated.

Complete medical personnel, from nurses, technicians, paramedics to doctors needs to be treated with respect and gratitude. Those people are the ones that put their lives aside, to save somebody else.

Recognize their effort, and show them you are thankful for their care and help.

Share if you care!

Image used: http://focus.cnhubei.com/consensus/200912/t883804.shtml

Which medical specialty is considered the most cerebral by other doctors? Why?

The question was asked on Quora byand answered by Liang-Hai Sie

It Would Depend on the Specialty of the Doctor Doing the Considering. There is an old joke which goes like this:

  • A GP doesn’t know anything and can’t do anything.
  • A Physician knows everything but can’t do anything.
  • A Surgeon doesn’t know anything but can do anything.
  • And lastly: The Pathologist is always right, but arrives too late….

Of course, in the present day’s situation there is no truth to that joke, but it shows how different kinds of medical specialist view each other & how they respect each other:

  • The Surgeons are annoyed by what they see as the Physicians’ indecision, meaning they take too long a time before reaching a conclusion.
  • The Physicians think the Surgeons are too Aggressive and Gung Ho, jumping in before everything is clear.
  • Surgeons and Physicians alike tended to dismiss the GP out of hand.

Tell us in a comment, which specialty do you think is the most respected one by other doctors and why?

Photo Credits: People image created by Javi_indy – Freepik.com

How Smart are Medical Doctors?

OK, I know that’s a slightly contentious phrasing of the question 😉

I mean, is being a medical doctor an intellectually demanding job?

Traditionally this is obviously true. Doctors have had to spend years learning a lot of information (about the body and its symptoms) and spent those years in education surrounded by other clever and ambitious people.

Now that more of this information can be looked up in databases, more diagnoses rely on automated equipment (driven by radiographers etc.) and more treatments depend on prescribing a course of drugs designed elsewhere (by pharmaceutical researchers) does doctoring still have the same profile? Or is it more about interpersonal skills (bedside manner, reassurance). Is being a good doctor becoming more like being a good nurse?

This question was posted on Quora  and answered by Liang-Hai Sie 

Let me answer as a retired doc who had had 40 years of experience with clinical (not research) work as a doc, for decades also working with a lot of young bright eyed docs who were part of our house staff.

Those who have graduated as a MD at least have a IQ of 120 to 130, so you need some intelligence, but need not be a genius.

As for the junior doctors, those having graduated with honors are often so occupied doing everything so perfect that they lose sight of the practical way of running things, so aren’t finished until late in the evening often 10pm which can’t be good, the less brilliant colleagues usually finish between 5 and 7 pm, so are better able at not spending lots of time by trying to be perfect.
I would gladly take a smart enough but not brilliant practical doc to work with me or be my partner.
EDIT:
having a lot of information on the web doesn’t mean a doctor needs no knowledge at all.  To look something up (where can one find useful information, what information does one need etc.) one will need basic knowledge, a lot of information at your fingertip, imagine having to look up everything on every patient, won’t work, and won’t inspire any confidence either.  The art of practicing medicine fortunately is not just following a recipe.

and by Emily Altman

In order to order all those tests that supposedly tell doctors all the answers, you have to have at least a differential diagnosis of what possible illness or condition the patient may have.  That means you have to know how to examine the patient and know what factors are important in the medical history/family history and review of systems.  Then having ordered tests (if necessary, because a doctor may know what the problem is without needing tests or equipment) you have to put the information together to come up with a diagnosis, determine what treatments would benefit the patient and then administer those treatments.

The ability to learn and synthesize learned information (if we can define smart by those terms) is tested many times along the way from high school to post-residency/fellowship MD.  So, yes, we do have objective proof that doctors (and I am proud to be one) are smart.

Doctors are the proverbial sight for the three blind men and an elephant that you are proposing with pharmaceutical researchers and automated programs and devices. That’s because they know how to put information together and not base their judgments and decisions only from the standpoint of a pharmaceutical researcher or an MRI machine.

Nurses do know a lot about diseases and how to take care of patients, but their education and training is not geared towards diagnosis and proposing a treatment as much as patient observation and administering the treatments.  And I might add I learned tons from nurses, especially as an intern in the ICU with experienced, smart nurses who knew exactly what they were doing and were a tremendous asset.

As for programs and devices, just remember the GIGO Law.  It’s truly garbage in garbage out.  If you give a program random facts about a patient, it will come up with a list of possibilities, but it cannot decide what the problem is.

Photo credits Technology image created by Creativeart – Freepik.com

‘Fear Not, This Is Normal’: Advice for Young Doctors

Medscape asked some of our contributors and our community to offer advice to soon-to-be residents. The responses that poured in went far beyond the expected tips to help achieve success during residency. Most submissions included insights from years of professional experience, along with wisdom to help all young doctors, not just those in training. In fact, the scope of the advice is likely to trigger reflection in those of all ages.

Here are just a few highlights of what they had to say. Prime Directive One of the themes that emerged among the advice that was offered involved a need to prioritize. Dr Brad Spellberg suggested that times have changed. He told us, “We must engage our patients in decision-making and move away from the traditional, physician-centric paternalism of medicine, which is contrary to achieving high-quality, safe, efficient, and patient-centered care.” Dr Spellberg was not alone in suggesting a shift from “physician-centric” attitudes. An emphasis on listening to, and learning from, patients was repeated as a guiding dictum. As Dr J. Greensmith explained, “The patients are your best teachers, followed by the nurses, then your attendings.”

In fact, developing a fast appreciation for nurses was another common refrain. Dr Mark Morris was explicit, as he laid out his advice: “Please remember that the only thing between you and disaster is the nurses. Honor them; respect them; and, if you’re a DO, treat them. Don’t go to sleep when you first can; sit and talk with them, learn from them. And they will feed you and protect your sleep.” Much of the advice suggested considering those who surround young doctors as new family units.

These groups include nurses and fellow residents, and beyond residency, peers who will grow to be very familiar faces. Cheerfully, Dr Brent Mothner offered, “Never pass up the opportunity for a meeting, or even a quick coffee together. Great things can happen simply by chatting along the way. Oh, and good cookies make almost any day better!” A Resident State of Mind In terms of advice specific to the residency experience, Dr Lisa Gobar offered some quality reassurance: “You are starting all over again. You will feel like you know nothing. Fear not, this is normal.” Encouragement permeated the advice provided from our contributors and users, with many sharing personal stories of doubt that gave way to experience.

The overwhelming attitude was that although young doctors are sure to face personal crises, they can be overcome. While accepting that a certain amount of fear is normal, other situations in residency can be avoided with preparation. As Dr Merius Atangcho specified, “Scan the ACGME curriculum requirements.

Probably no medical student ever looks at ACGME curriculum/resident experience requirements to graduate from a residency. Especially when deciding between different fields, however, these requirements can inform you of what your entire residency will look like.” Others recommended concrete suggestions that involved surveying the medical literature thoroughly and learning to approach the resident experience as a rebirth. The full article you can read it on medscape.